Tag Archives: Yucatan Peninsula

iLCP RAVE Retrospective, places worth saving on Discovery’s Planet Green

Go on a virtual travel adventure for conservation with images (one of them is mine!) from the RAVE Retrospective by the International League of Conservation Photographer’s. RAVEs, or Rapid Assessment Visual Expeditions, consist of teams of professional iLCP photographers who explore a region facing imminent environmental threat to document as much of its nature, culture and environmental impacts as possible in a short amount of time, usually a few weeks at most.

The select images featured on Discovery.com’s “Planet Green” will give you the 4-1-1 on all the RAVEs that have taken place to date, including ones in Bioko, the Yucatan, Great Bear Rainforest, Canada’s Flathead wilderness and the Chesapeake Bay.

Better yet, you can check out these and other amazing photographs at the G2 Gallery in Venice, Cali., from January 4 – February 13.

iLCP RAVE list (so far!):

Bioko

Wyoming

Yucatan

Flathead

Great Bear Rainforest

Chesapeake Bay

Borderlands

El Triunfo

Balandra

Patagonia

Sacred Headwaters, British Columbia

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WILD9 World Wilderness Congress: Different toolbox, same mission

Young Professionals and some of histories greatest conservationists gather at the Piedradeagua Hotel in Merida, Mexico, to enjoy some fine dining and discussions of how to conserve our planet. (Photo/Morgan Heim)

WILD9, thrusts you into a different world. Standing among so many of your heroes, legendary conservationists like Jane Goodall, and many of the world’s most renown conservation photographers can be an overwhelming experience, especially for a young professional. Everyone comes from a different background, science, conservation, communication, policy and business. Throw into that mix the intermingling of culture all around us, and it’s hard to know where to focus. And as any photographer can tell you, not knowing where to focus makes us just a little bit nervous.

But as the days pass, a transformation happens, and you start relating to each other as fellow human-beings with a common purpose. We are holding different parts of the puzzle and bringing it all together. We are participants. And after a few days, the mayhem begins to settle until you flow between roles and people and conversations.

Sasha, a young professional from Kamchatka, Russia jumps into a doorway to avoid streets flooded from the rains that hit Merida most likely in connection with Hurricane Ida.

I’ve been lucky. Much of this congress has focused on the role of conservation’s next generation. Of which, I am a part. I’ve had the opportunity to participate on panels, giving talks about how to use new media to further conservation messages. And work with the other young professionals on their media training day. It’s quite clear that we are here for a reason.

Last Tuesday night, many of the young professionals attended a special dinner in the ivy-walled gardens of the Piedradeagua Hotel in Merida. Fellow iLCP emerging league photographer Joe Riis was there, along with young professionals with veterinary backgrounds, community planning, and nature conservation management. And we found ourselves dining with the likes of Dr. Kenneth Miller, former Director General of the IUCN. To me this symbolized the culmination of our partnerships and the importance of meetings like the WILD9 World Wilderness Congress – a community of conservationists, each using a different toolbox, and spanning generations, but working together for the future.


The Mangrove Forests of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula

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more about “Mangrove Forests of Yucatan“, posted with vodpod

Along the Yucatan Peninsula, in a land of heat and drenching humidity thrives a rare mangrove ecosystem, important for coastal life and home to jaguarundi, hundreds of bird species and, yes, maybe a mosquito or two.  I hope you enjoy this short jaunt into the mangroves, sans the mosquitoes, near Celestun in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. One afternoon doesn’t do a place like this justice, but it is a glimpse into this vulnerable ecosystem that is increasingly under threat from climate change, deforestation, pollution and coral reef degradation.


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